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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries in 2001, approximately 31% of workplace fatalities of women and 14% of workplace fatalities of men were caused by interpersonal assaults. (U.S. Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics (2001). Census of fatal occupational injuries. Washington, D.C.)
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI)system data for calendar year 2003, homicides were the second leading cause of death of the job for women, and 15% of the 119 workplace homicides of women in that year were attributed to a current or former husband or boyfriend.

(There were a total of 444 workplace deaths of women in 2003 -- 31% were the result of highway incidents, 27% were homicides, and 9% were falls.)
A total of 1,687 people were killed by intimate partners in 2000. Of those, 1,247 were women and 440 were men. In recent years an intimate killed about 33% of female murder victims and about 4% of male murder victims. Between 1993 and 2000 the proportion of all male murder victims killed by an intimate was relatively stable while the proportion of female murder victims killed by an intimate increased slightly.

(Intimate Partner Violence, 1993 - 2001. Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief, February 2003, NCJ 197838)
According to the FBI's Supplementary Homicide Reports 1976-1999, 59% of the murder victims known to have been killed by an intimate in 1999 were shot to death.

(Bureau of Justice Statistics, Homicide Trends in the United States, Intimate Homicide, 2001)
Between 1993 and 1999, an intimate was responsible for 45% of homicides of women age 20-24 and almost 40% of homicides of women age 35-49.

(Rennison, C.M., PhD., Intimate Partner Violence and Age of Victim, 1993-99, 2001, NCJ-187635)
30% of women murdered in the United States in 1999 were murdered by a husband, former husband or boyfriend.

(Bureau of Justice Statistics, Homicide Trends in the United States, Intimate Homicide, 2001)
Job-related homicides rose from 651 in 1999 to 677 in 2000, the first increase in six years, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

(This information is a product of the Bureau of Labor Statistics Safety and Health Statistics Program. Additional information is available from "National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, 2000," news release USDL 01-261.)
31,260 women were murdered by an intimate from 1976-1996.

(Violence by Intimates: Analysis of Data on Crimes by Current or Former Spouses, Boyfriends, and Girlfriends, U.S. Department of Justice, March, 1998)
In 1996, nearly 75% of those murdered by an intimate partner in the US were women.

(Greenfield, L.A., and others, Violence by Intimates: Analysis of data on crimes by current or former spouses, boyfriends, and girlfriends. US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, 1998. NCJ-167237)
Of 57 domestic homicides occurring in New York State between 1990 and 1997, 75% of the victims had ended the relationship or stated an intention to end it at the time of their death.

(New York State Commission on Domestic Violence Fatalities, Report to the Governor, (Albany, NY: 1997), 8)
In 1996, approximately 1,800 murders were attributed to intimates; nearly three out of four of these (1,326) had a female victim.

(Bureau of justice Statistics)

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